Could there be an Electoral College tie?

Contingent elections have occurred only three times in American history: in 1801, 1825, and 1837. In 1800, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr, the presidential and vice-presidential nominees on the ticket of the Democratic-Republican Party, received the same number of electoral votes.

What does Section 3 of the Constitution mean?

The Constitution confers on the U.S. Senate legislative, executive, and judicial powers. Finally, Article I, Section 3 also gives the Senate the exclusive judicial power to try all cases of impeachment of the President, the Vice President, or any other civil officer of the United States.

What is an elector that ignores the popular vote called?

Faithless elector laws by state In the United States Electoral College, a faithless elector is an elector who does not vote for the candidates for U.S. President and U.S. Vice President for whom the elector had pledged to vote and instead votes for another person for one or both offices or abstains from voting.

How much does a president makes?

According to Title 3 of the US code, a president earns a $400,000 salary and is still on government payroll after leaving office. The president is also granted a $50,000 annual expense account, $100,000 nontaxable travel account, and $19,000 for entertainment.

What does Article 2 Section 3 of the Constitution mean?

Article II, Section 3 both grants and constrains presidential power. It further grants the President the authority to adjourn Congress whenever the chambers cannot agree when to adjourn, a power that no President has ever exercised. Section 3 imposes obligations on the President that are varied and significant.

Why do we vote on Tuesday?

Tuesday was chosen as Election Day so that voters could attend church on Sunday, travel to the polling location (usually in the county seat) on Monday, and vote before Wednesday, which was usually when farmers would sell their produce at the market.

Which president won the most electoral votes in a single election?

By winning 523 electoral votes, Roosevelt received 98.49% of the electoral vote total, which remains the highest percentage of the electoral vote won by any candidate since 1820.

Can a president be charged with a crime?

The President of the Republic and the First Vice President has immunity against any legal proceedings and they cannot be accused or sued in any court of law during their term in office.

How does a US election work?

When people cast their vote, they are actually voting for a group of people called electors. The number of electors each state gets is equal to its total number of Senators and Representatives in Congress. Each elector casts one vote following the general election. The candidate who gets 270 votes or more wins.

How long does a recount take?

Most counties can recount all ballots in one day. Some counties may take two days. King County will need approximately four days to recount all ballots.

How often are elections held in the US?

Federal elections occur every two years, on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November. Every member of the House of Representatives and about one-third of the Senate is up for reelection in any given election year. A presidential election is held every fourth year.

What are the 4 impeachable offenses?

2.2 Impeachable Offenses: Historical Background. Article II, Section 4: The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

How does popular vote affect electoral college?

That’s partially correct. When citizens cast their ballots for president in the popular vote, they elect a slate of electors. Electors then cast the votes that decide who becomes president of the United States. Usually, electoral votes align with the popular vote in an election.

How is electoral college votes determined?

Under the “Electoral College” system, each state is assigned a certain number of “votes”. The formula for determining the number of votes for each state is simple: each state gets two votes for its two US Senators, and then one more additional vote for each member it has in the House of Representatives.